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20121127
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or relief that at least the election didn't end up in a situation where obama won the electoral vote but romney got the popular vote. i agree that would have been bad. it would have denied the democrat the clear mandate. the implication from the right wing seemed to have been had the republican candidate won the popular vote, there would be trouble of some undefined type. what the heck did that mean? yes, we've had to put up with this ridiculous secession petitions out there, the texas version having been signed by over 100,000 people since election day, but could the right have gone further had it been armed with a popular vote victory? there does seem to be a difference in the two parties. when al gore lost 12 years ago, he ignored his 600,000 vote victory in the popular vote. he just learned to live with the irony. republicans have carefully forgotten this bit of history, but i have real doubts those on the angry, demanding right would have been so quietly obedient to constitutional law. there's something out there on the right right now that is still uneasy with this defeat. sear
in this election. what made them think so? the polls were tight but favoring president obama. what north star was guiding the gop convincing them that the white house would be back in their hands in january? back where their hankerings were convinced it belonged? there was a darker side to this deep sense of executive entitlement, the sense they had the same assumed access to the white house as they did in the corporate dining room. it's more than a bit frighting. i have heard at least one person of the right state their pained belief or relief that at least the election didn't end up in a situation where obama won the electoral vote but romney got the popular vote. i agree that would have been bad. it would have denied the democrat the clear mandate. the implication from the right wing seemed to have been had the republican candidate won the popular vote, there would be trouble of some undefined type. what the heck did that mean? yes, we've had to put up with this ridiculous secession petitions out there, the texas version having been signed by over 100,000 people since election day, but cou
obama promise, but some promises are made to be broken, and i think this is probably a good move. but first up congress back at work tonight after the holiday recess with now just 35 days to go. are we any closer to a tax and fiscal cliff fix? cnbc's own chief washington correspondent john harwood joins us now with all the details. good evening, john. >> reporter: good evening, laurie, and i think we are getting somewhat closer, and the white house would count it as good news that you found common cause with their report on the impact of fiscal spending. let's talk for a moment about what's happened on the fiscal cliff by the numbers since that early constructive meeting with the congressional leaders and the president. the numbers are all one. there's one month left for these leaders to figure it out. two, 1.4 it is is the amount to be shaved off by gdp and one is the amount of trillions of dollars that democratic aides, senior democratic aides tell me is necessary to get a deal wit end of the year with the remaining 3 trillion of savings coming in the early part of next year, a
about the idea of going off the fiscal cliff. alan krueger, the chairman of president obama's economic advisers, he spoke about what would happen if we go off this so-called fiscal cliff. in this report put out by the white house, american consumers will spend 200 billion less in 2013 if the fiscal cliff is not averted according to this white house report. jay carney went on to say in this press briefing that president obama believes and understands that in order to achieve a deal, a compromise, that everybody has to make tough choices and he remains committed. but this is what he said about social security -- the white house is less interested in tackling the rising costs of social security during the current talks. so that is what is the latest coming out of the white house on the fiscal cliff talks. the two sides not scheduled to meet face to face. as you heard from the prevent of the congressional leaders are the weekend and the two sides separately meeting this week in washington with business leaders and as we said, unions are planning protests on capitol hill. a lot to talk abou
our viewers on c-span as well. it's been almost exactly four years since president obama's a famously extended his hand of friendship and hope the iranians would unclench their fists. yet today after a few rounds of diplomacy, plenty more sanctions and centrifuge, there are plenty of clinched this on both sides and very little talk about friendship. there's been an attempt at diplomacy but political constraints on both sides have been difficult to advance an old habits are difficult to break. obama's one of the lowest in 2009 was quickly closed by the human rights abuses in the iran following the fraudulent elections. as well as a growing pressure from congress as will some u.s. allies in the region against diplomacy. focus shifted to sanctions and tehran responded by further expanding its nuclear program leaving both sides worse off today than they were a few years ago. in the meantime, sanctions have held iranian middle class for the impoverished population while the regime's repression and human rights abuses have continued to intensify and its nuclear program has continued to expa
will also hear from president obama, who signed the deficit reduction measure into law, part of the deal to raise the debt ceiling. first, senate majority leader harry reid and republican majority leader mitch mcconnell will talk on the senate floor about the january fiscal deadline. >> since our country voted to return president obama to the white house, i have spoken often about compromise. i remain optimistic that, when it comes to our economy, when it comes to protecting middle-class families from a whopping tax hike, republicans and democrats will be able to find common ground. president dwight eisenhower, a republican, once said, "people talk about the middle of the road as though it were unacceptable. there have to be compromises. the middle of the road is all usable space." so said white house and higher. -- dwight eisenhower. too often, we face off, not realizing that the solution rests somewhere in the middle. i remind everyone of one fact. this congress is one vote away from avoiding a fiscal cliff for middle-class families and small businesses. we can solve the greatest econo
think particularly coming out of this -- obama out of a strong election. no one like gaddafi. no one liked libya. no one liked the soviets. it's doable. >> to partially answer the same question. the issue for many in congress is whether this negotiation quote-unquote allows iran to continue enriching at the 3.5% level or not. the historical position of the united states going back to the early 2000's has been that there should be a suspension of all enrichment as a confidence-building measure. from what you're saying, jim, we're well past that point and iran has a lot of truth on the ground in terms of additional centrifuges and they want the -- their so-called right under the nonproliferation treaty to be recognized. the question is at what level do they continue. >> i think there's also -- i agree with that. i want to go on here. there is a debate over countries have the right to enrich. they have a right to peaceful activities. there's some ambiguities about that. people disagree. both the iranians have said, offered this as a principle. i think it's important to have principles t
's almost always the wrong question. >> there is one federal policy change that says a second term obama administration might push. is there one that comes to mind? >> i would like to see -- i would like to see the conversation around gainful employment extend beyond the career and for-profit colleges to the entire sector and shining a light on more of the outcomes there. the second part to me is the biggest challenge with the gainful employment regulations as they stand now, we have suggested our own counter mechanism. the biggest problem is that it's an all or nothing access to cash. you either clear up our and have access to the federal loan dollars from title for -- from title 4, or you get zero out completely. the problem is -- you want to extend access to population to have not had a historical access to education. on the other hand, you are interested in quality in a very admittedly tough environment. you can make quality high because of the wage scale back the access. the other side, if you make that are too low, the lead in all the -- if you make the bar too low, you leave in al
to the same argument creating a bond. you are together for a long time. i hope president obama appoints another to the court, and work together for another 25 years. i said that once to justice kagan, and she said, only 25? [laughter] she's younger than i am. you learn to get along and know you work on a common enterprise. the level of the institution, the extent to which the justices have a collegial relationship with each other. >> two things to follow-up with a flip question. anything that unpleasantly surprised you since joining the court? >> yes. i'll limit that to one though. [laughter] "unpleasant" is the wrong word. i have a fair amount of responsibilities. the court is the highest in the land. it is a small government of the agency, people fall on the front steps, and you need the right computers of the court. we completed a renovation of the court involving a lot of administrative concerns. if you visit washington and visit the court, you wonder why the front is obscured by the scrim. it's like a sheet, and, well, the chunks of marble fell off of it. it's a huge enterprise to
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9